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20130318
20130326
STATION
KQED (PBS) 19
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. > that's why we're here. >> additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs . ations from viewers like you corporate funding is also provide bid prudential. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it took him four years to get there, but when barack obama arrived in israel for the first time as president this week, he had what he called his homework .n hand on the list, healing a political rift with prime minister benjamin netanyahu, winning over a skeptical and gently c, restarting the moribund middle east peace talks in part by appealing to israelis to see it from the palestinian point of iew. >> put yourself in their shoes. look at the world through their eyes. just as israelis built a state in their homeland, palestinians have a right to be a free people in their own land. gw
the economy gets better, puts off the grand bargain, makes progress on immigration and energy, deals with gun control however it gets dealt with and thin waits to do a grand bargain deal after the mid terms on the hope that his party has success in the mid terms and he can strike a deal on better economy and more favorable terms in congress. >> rose: i thought that's exactly what i said. he will not make a decision now and will have a hard bargain. the only thing we seem to differ is whether the republicans will be blamed. >> i didn't mean to say i disagree with you except to say it's not giving up on the next year and-a-half because you do, immigration and energy. the president's got his eye on his big promises and immigration and energy are two of the big promises. if he can move along on fiscal stuff, get a sense of where the bargain lies on tax reform, corporate and individual, gets a sense of how obamacare is working and what an overhaul of obamacare would mean. he can move those things along. get immigration and energy out of the way. there's only so much bandwidth at any given time. g
included energy infrastructure, levies, and inland waterways. inland waterways getting a d-minus, barely above a failing grade. how, if you know, does the u.s. infrastructure compare with that of other countries? in some surveys, very poorly, i believe. >> well, what we do know is that our infrastructure is a part of our competitiveness in the world. if we want to be competitive we need to invest. we can look at things such as china investing some 9% in their infrastructure. europe investing 5% of their gdp in infrastructure. yet you look at the united states, and we're down around 2%. and that's about half of what we invested 50 years ago. >> what about bridges? where -- how -- you know, there have been major stories having to do with the safety of our bridges, that major collapse in minneapolis a few years ago, are they getting better or not? >> yes. they're actually getting better. they improved over our 2009 report card. again, reflecting an increase investment in bridges. we're seeing that around the nation as local leaders step up and start replacing bridges that need to be replace
's. frankly, i did not anticipate winning. i was stunned. i sat there with the energy and intensity of what this meant to so many people. the city attorney is having a press conference. come down stairs. i got caught up in that moment. i was talking about the history of the rights movement. if you like it or not, over the objections of the majority, we fight for the minorities. the rift went there. it was used effectively. >> scott: living through history. >> remarkable. we ultimately as dr. king said, we eventually get it right. in this respect, the words were wrong. they were inartful. the majority is not necessarily there. i think now a majority of americans are on same-sex marriage. >> scott: thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: the court of public opinion is shifting in favor of marriage equality. a recent poll found that 61% of californians now support same-sex marriage. 32% oppose it. politicians now on both sides of the aisle speak out in gay marriage. i spoke with andrew pugno from washington, d.c. he is part of the legal team defending proposition 8. andy pugno, welc
at the u.n. last fall. iran maintains its nuclear program is solely for peaceful energy production. as the arab uprisings convulse the president viewed a missile battery of the iron dome defense system-- heavily financed by the u.s., which knocked scores of rockets from the sky during brief november war with gaza. the president's remarks heavy with allusions to millenia of jewish history in the holy land and a nod to the broad purposes of his trip. >> across this region the winds of change bring both promise and peril. so i see this visit as an opportunity to reaffirm the unbreakable bonds between our nations, to restate america's unwavering commitment to israel's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> warner: he was referring to another focus of this visit: to listen to what israeli and palestinian leaders say they're willing to do to revive the stalled peace process between them. later at a press conference at the prime minister's jerusalem residence, the president was asked about yesterday's possible chemical weapons attack in northern
for chavez. one of the first to hear that hugo chavez had died was his loyal energy minister, rafael. chavez will be a constant presence in this election campaign, he says. but nicholas will also try to be his own man. >> he's not chavez nor would anyone expect him to be. we're all chavez, as the slogan goes, and that is the concept of the campaign. of course nicholas will be different iraqis not trying to imitate chavez. he can't be imitated. but the essence of his political ideas and his philosophy are perfectly represented by nicholas. >> one of the biggest and most violent chanty towns, many residents live under a self-imposed curfew. the opposition are likely to make the issue of crime a key part of their campaign. but how can their candidate who lost to mr. chavez in october win? given the wave of grief sweeping venezuela. call everyone for the important struggle. we're facing huge challenges that go beyond our generation. but i think that we have at the same time a wonderful, unique opportunity to have a few transformation. >> the pro-chavez heartlands are still in shock at their lead
of the energy from the party now? who won the c-pac straw poll, rand paul not an establishment republican, a person from the libertarian wing of the party. they are not together on some of the mechanical things. the report recommends going to primaries as opposed to caucuses and conventions because that's a broader electorate. well, caucuses and conventions are the way somebody like a rand paul or even a rick santorum is going to be able to be a real competitor for the nomination. >> ifill: it talks about cutting in half the number of primary debates. a little bit of the early season cannibalization doesn't occur. >> we see this after party loses a presidential race or two. >> whatever they did last time. they try to do something else. but i think the problem for the r.n.c. is this. our politics and our lives, our world, has changed. we're no longer... politics is no longer dominated by the hierarchical national parties that 40, 50 years ago could dictate who can run for office and when to have conventions and raise the money. you have all these other sources of power and influence, wheth
there was a big bottleneck in a lot of different scientific labs ranging from astronomy to high energy fisics to oceanography where they were generating tremendous volumes of data and they didn't have the software and hardware infrastructure to be able to capture and analyze that data effectively. >> rose: i remember maybe a year or two ago i was talking to mark an creasean sitting right here. >> sure. >> rose: and reed half-man and a group of people you know. and i say what is the next big idea and everybody talked about mobile but they said the thing you have to watch is what is happening to big data. what's happening? >> we went through a period in which data generation seemed to grow exponentially and that lead to the requirement to build software that could then collect and analyze that data. so if you look at the world wide web, all of a sudden we were taking all the documents, all of the speak jacks that people were serializing its text and we were placing them on-line into an open reposit or of linked data walled the world wide web and it turns out there was a tremendous amount of val
be to deal with the environmental crisis that we have, to change the way we use energy. for example ,just to give one, to give us the proper mass transportation system that advanced countries in other parts of the world already have that we ought to have. millions of people could go to work producing that system and give us a way to move our goods and move our people around the society using less oil and gas with less damage of injury and death the way our car-driven system has, with less pollution of our environment. here's a way to benefit people on many scales while we put to work those who want to work with the raw materials and tools that are available. and the third thing i would do is take a page from italy, yes, italy who passed a law in 1985 called the marcora law which said the following wonderful thing. if you want employment you have a choice in italy. you don't just have to collect your weekly unemployment check the way we do here in the united states, you have an option. if you get together with ten other unemployed workers and you agree to do the following thing, the govern
is that the middle east, regardless of whether the united states achieves energy independence any time soon, the middle east is a geopolitical center that is not easy to pivot away from. i think that daunting list of challenges that you just ran over suggests why that is. i also think if you look at what senator-turned-secretary kerry's agenda is, you get the sense of this is still very much a political figure. he spent 29 years in the senate which prizes a kind of face-to-face diplomacy, if you will, the handshake, the look 'em in the eye. that was a mission that then senator kerry often undertook for barack obama when he was the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. he went to afghanistan. he met with karzai. i think this is a somewhat familiar role for him. it's very different, by the way, than the way that hillary clinton used her time and credibility in the job. >> ifill: whether it's syria or what we just saw in afghanistan or whether it's worrying about the red lines with iran or the middle east peace process, it always comes down to whether the u.s. has the leverage to
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)